Sunday, January 16, 2022

OBG: No Understanding without Foundation Knowledge Part 3 -- Debunking an Online Exchange 2

Note: To demonstrate the correctness and stability offered by a sound theoretical foundation (relative to the industry's fad-driven "cookbook" practices), I am re-publishing as "Oldies But Goodies" material from the old (2000-06) DBDebunk.com, so that you can judge for yourself how well my arguments hold up and whether the industry has progressed beyond the misconceptions those arguments were intended to dispel. I may revise, break into parts, and/or add comments and/or references, which I enclose in square brackets).

In Part 1 I debunked a review of my third book, which triggered an exchange @SlashDot.org critical of my article If You Liked SQL, You'll Love XQuery. Part 2 was the first part of a debunking of that exchange, to be completed in this and forthcoming Part 4.

Slashing a SlashDot Exchange Part 3

(first published in 2001 @DBazine.com)

The following comments being debunked are by the W3C XML Query Working Group's Activity Lead and by an academic. [The exchange took place when XML DBMS was one of the hottest fads as late as 2013.  Consider them in this context: where are XML DBMSs today?]

“The article seems to say ‘I don’t like SQL and I don’t like XML and I think XML Query is about merging them although I don’t understand it very well, so the people working on XML Query must be stupid, and in any case it’s easier to attack people than understand a specification.’ Perhaps that’s unfair, but it’s clear to me that the writer is a little fuzzy on the design goals of XML and also on the focus of SQL development over the past 10 or 15 years. In both cases the story is about interoperability.”

Saturday, January 8, 2022

OBG: No Understanding Without Foundation Knowledge Part 2 -- Debunking an Online Exchange 1

Note: To demonstrate the soundness and stability conferred by a sound theoretical foundation (relative to the industry's fad-driven "cookbook" practices), I am re-publishing as "Oldies But Goodies" material from the old (2000-06) DBDebunk.com, so that you can judge for yourself how well my arguments hold up and whether the industry has progressed beyond the misconceptions those arguments were intended to dispel. In re-publishing I may revise, break into or merge parts and/or add comments and/or references that I enclose in square brackets). 

In Part 1 I debunked a review of my third book, which had triggered an exchange @SlashDot.org in reaction to an article of mine @DBAzine.com. This and forthcoming Parts 3 and 4 were my debunkings of that exchange, in which a W3C XML committee member and an academic -- who ought to have known better -- participated. 

Saturday, January 1, 2022

Schema and Performance: Never the Twain Shall Meet

One of the core objectives of this site (and my work) has been to demonstrate that there will not be progress in data management as long as the industry and trade media require and promote exclusively (mainly tool) experience in the absence of foundation knowledge. I have published and analyzed ample evidence that relational language and terminology are used without grasping what it actually means -- a good way to gauge lack of foundation knowledge.

Recently I posted a four part series titled "Nobody Understands the Relational Model" showing that even a practitioner steeped in the RDM does not really understand it. Consider now a practitioner's mistake at the beginning of career -- "a bad database schema and what it did to system performance" -- which, he claims, belatedly taught him a lesson. Hhhhmmm, did it, really?

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