Monday, July 3, 2017

New Paper: Logical Symmetric Access, Data Sub-language, Kinds of Relations, Database Redundancy and Consistency

NEW!!! Paper #2 in the Understanding the Real RDM series. NEW!!!

 

The data management field cannot and will not progress without educated and informed data professionals and users. UNDERSTANDING THE REAL RDM is a new series of papers that offers informal access to the forthcoming McGoveran interpretation of the formal real RDM envisioned by E. F. Codd (EFC), contrasts it with the current understanding that emerged after EFC's death and demonstrates the practical implications of the differences.

If you are a thinking data professional interested in understanding the scientific foundations of data management, as opposed to the "cookbook" industry practices, these unique papers are a must read. They give you new insights into the RDM--which I call the real data science--and the practical benefits that fail to materialize due to its misuse and abuse promulgated by DBMS vendors, the trade media, "experts" and poor SQL implementations, all of which ignore its formal theoretical grounding from which all the practical benefits derive. You will also learn to minimize the consequences of deficiencies of and optimize the use of SQL.

The series starts with an analysis of the evolution of E. F. Codd's thinking between 1969-1980, which will then be used to show how McGoveran's interpretation follows from his RDM vision and with what consequences. Paper #1, The Interpretation and Representation Of Database Relations, covers the structural component of of the RDM as introduced in EFC's two initial 1969-70 papers.

Paper #2 covers the sections not discussed in paper #1 (net of the relational algebra, which is deferred to a future paper), as follows:

Table of Contents

Acknowledgement

Preface

Introduction

1. Logical Symmetric Access

2. Universal Data Sub-language

2.1. FOPL vs. SOPL
2.2. Relational Completeness
2.3. Computational Completeness and Hosting

3. Kinds of Relations
3.1. Expressible and Named Relations
3.2. Derived Relations
3.3. Relations with Stored Data


4. Derived Relations and Redundancy
4.1. Database Consistency

5. Database Catalog

Conclusion

References

Both papers are available to order from the PAPERS page.




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